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EMMA THOMPSON IS THE BEST

ms-emma-thompson:

SHE IS GORGEOUS

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SHE IS INTELLIGENT

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SHE IS THE MOST AMAZING ACTRESS

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SHE IS ADORABLE

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SHE HAS THE HOTTEST HUSBAND

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SHE HAS A BEAUTIFUL LOOK-A-LIKE DAUGHTER

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SHE HAS AN AMAZING SON

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SHE GIVES A SHIT ABOUT THE WORLD AND HUMAN RIGHTS

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SHE DOESN’T GIVE A SHIT ABOUT WHAT PEOPLE THINK

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SHE  HATES HIGH HEELS

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AND SHE LOVES TO DRINK

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O… AND DID I MENTION SHE IS FUCKING HILARIOUS

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RE-BLOG IF YOU LOVE EMMA THOMPSON

Love her!

aposse:

Let me tell you about the sheer brilliance that is Meryl Streep and her creation of Miranda Priestly.

Ask any young woman what her favourite film of Meryl’s would be, and I’m quite certain that The Devil Wears Prada would come up in conversation, favourite or not. And it may seem like a generic answer: oh, a film about fashion, so obviously women would identify with it. No, that’s not it. This film isn’t about fashion. This film, as Meryl says, “is a story about a woman at the head of a corporate ladder who’s misunderstood, who’s motives and pressures on her are intense and who doesn’t have time to play certain nice games.”

And though screentime and first bill casting can indicate that Andrea Sachs is the main character, who are you really left thinking about at the end of the film?

Miranda Priestly — the woman who was written as a fictional equivalent to Anna Wintour from the novelist Lauren Weisberger’s experience as her assistant — in the novel was a raging, two-dimensional boss from Hell written only to antagonize and complicate the lives of her employees with impossible standards and even more impossible demands. She was expected to resemble Vogue’s editor-in-chief (Miranda’s office in the film a near replica of Anna’s), so imagine everyone’s fucking surprise the first day Meryl showed up on set wearing an untested wig white as snow, with a voice that never raised, where the most deadly delivery was a whisper.

But this scene on the right, this scene that hadn’t existed until Meryl went and thought, “wait a minute, there’s an imbalance of character here…” so she brought it to light and this was written. Sparingly, as it was said, yet one of the very few scenes to be altered in the entire film. This is how it went: Meryl showed up to the scene without any make-up. She walked in, didn’t talk to anybody, sat down and did it, got up and left, went downstairs and waited. She did this scene once.

Once. 

Once.

And the thing is, this wasn’t meant for you to suddenly cheer for Miranda; it was to show you that she was human and that her success came with a costly price that hurt her the most. She thawed the Snow Queen, extinguished the flames of the fiery boss from Hell and gave her what she never had on paper: substance.

If completely reinventing a character from a subpar novel by giving her actual character and successfully distinguishing her from the woman she was based on isn’t considered pure talent, then I don’t know what is.

So flipping agree :)

fuckyeahmelancholy:

eqad-mod:

firestorm310:

littleangrykitten:

ejacutastic:

(source)

Faith in humanity restored! Never judge a book by its cover! 

fuck yeah

These guys are some of the most amazing people.

Sons of Anarchy AU: Jax sits at the head of the table. “Alright, guys, we’re getting out of drugs… and into HUGS.”

I frakkin love these guys and wish they had been around in my town when I was a teen :(

For me, as an actress. One of the most essential things that I need to know is what do I want for and from the people around me in the story. What is my offering and what is my need? And quite often the need with any human being is to be loved, to be liked, to be connected to. Sharon Raydor, whenever I applied that or tried to discover what she wanted from them: that would not work. And so I would feel nervous or insecure. So what I discovered pretty early on—this was even in working by myself with the script—is that her need was to have them not get comfortable with her. She was the internal affairs person. She was policing the police. She didn’t want them to like her. She didn’t want them to try and seduce her into liking them. She wanted distance. She didn’t care. In other words, the less they like her, the better her job went. And once I got the power of the distance, the power I felt in being distant, and that I understood that that made her do her job more correctly. Then I was fine.
Mary McDonnell with Tavis Smiley, 1-09-2014 (via johnniewalkergirl)

See when I read this, I feel like Mary is an actress for the right reasons. She gets what it is about. She uses her craft not only to be a good actress, but to understand how people act and react toward one another. I love that she takes it seriously and learns from it :)

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